Sunday, August 19, 2018

Roasted Potatoes Dinner

ROASTED POTATOES DINNER




Roasted Potatoes Dinner 

Roasted Potatoes Dinner


Potatoes

Ingredients

2 large potatoes (cut into cubes)
Seasonings
Butter or vegetable oil

Chicken Nuggets

3 - 4 pieces Chicken Tenders
Flour - Seasonings - Egg
Vegetable Oil

Corn On Cob

1 - 2 Fresh Corn

Method

Potatoes

Combine and toss cubed potatoes with a little melted butter and seasonings of your liking.  Place in oven of 350 degrees and bake for approximately 45 minutes until tender and golden brown.

Chicken Nuggets

Combine 1/2 cup of flour and seasoning in a bowl.  Beat egg in separate bowl.  Cut chicken tenders into cubes.  Add and dip chicken cubes into beaten egg, then add to flour mixture and coat enough to cover.  Add to a hot frying pan of vegetable oil and cook.

Corn On Cob

Wash and clean corn.  Wrap corn in foil and sprinkle with a little salt.  Bake in an oven of 350 degrees for approximately 30 to 40 minutes.  Peel leaves and strings from corn.  Cut corn into small pieces and add to a pot of hot boiling water with a little salt and sugar.  Cover and at simmer temperature let sit or rest until tender.  Drain water off and add serve with a little butter.

For all photos on Roasted Potatoes Dinner, please click on the photos to this post here at Facebook.  For all other photos, please click on "Album Meals".

All Meals prepared, cooked and plated by ShirleyAnn Pearman
Photography by ShirleyAnn Pearman

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Potato

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The potato is a starchytuberous crop from the perennial nightshade Solanum tuberosumPotato may be applied to both the plant and the edible tuber.[2] Common or slang terms for the potato include tater and spud. Potatoes have become a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world's food supply. Potatoes are the world's fourth-largest food crop, following maize (corn), wheat, and rice.[3] Tubers produce glycoalkaloids in small amounts. If green sections (sprouts and skins) of the plant are exposed to light the tuber can produce a high enough concentration of glycoalkaloids to affect human health.[4][5]
In the Andes region of South America, where the species is indigenous, some other closely related species are cultivated. Potatoes were introduced to Europe in the second half of the 16th century by the Spanish. Wild potato species can be found throughout the Americas from the United States to southern Chile.[6] The potato was originally believed to have been domesticated independently in multiple locations,[7] but later genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species proved a single origin for potatoes in the area of present-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia (from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex), where they were domesticated approximately 7,000–10,000 years ago.[8][9][10] Following millennia of selective breeding, there are now over a thousand different types of potatoes.[9] Over 99% of the presently cultivated potatoes worldwide descended from varieties that originated in the lowlands of south-central Chile, which have displaced formerly popular varieties from the Andes.[11][12]
However, the local importance of the potato is variable and changing rapidly. It remains an essential crop in Europe (especially eastern and central Europe), where per capita production is still the highest in the world, but the most rapid expansion over the past few decades has occurred in southern and eastern Asia. As of 2014, China led the world in potato production, and, together with India, produced 37% of the world's potatoes.[13]

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Corn on the cob

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Corn on the cob (known regionally as "pole corn", "cornstick", "sweet pole", "butter-pop" or "long maize")[citation needed] is a culinary term used for a cooked ear of freshly picked maize from a cultivar of sweet corn. Sweet corn is the most common variety of maize eaten directly off the cob.[1] The ear is picked while the endosperm is in the "milk stage" so that the kernels are still tender. Ears of corn are steamed or boiled, usually without their green husks, or roasted with them. The husk leaves are in any case removed before serving.
Corn on the cob is normally eaten while still warm. It is often seasoned with salt and buttered before serving.[1] Some diners use specialized skewers, thrust into the ends of the cob, to hold the ear while eating without touching the hot and sticky kernels.
Within a day of corn being picked it starts converting sugar into starch, which results in reduction in the level of natural sweetness. Corn should be cooked and served the same day it harvested, as it takes only a single day for corn to lose up to 25% of its sweetness.[2]

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